Bird's Eye View of Bute

The Ringlet Butterfly

(1) Ringlet
(1) Ringlet
(2) Ringlet
(2) Ringlet
(3) Ringlet
(3) Ringlet
(4) Ringlet
(4) Ringlet
(5) Ringlet
(5) Ringlet

 

 

Island Life

The Ringlet Butterfly.
This week’s image of a Butterfly is unusual, not that it in itself is unusual, but it is how I got this image.
When I find something new in the nature field, I tell Jenny and Paul Toop about it, and they to me, and they will go and search for what I have seen, with usually good results, it is all about passing information amongest friends.

 


Well one day Jenny told me that any time that she wanted to see a Ringlet Butterfly; she only had to go to the golf practise area behind the Bush.
Well I said nothing then as I think that she thought that I had seen plenty of them, but I had not even seen one, so up to that site two days later and I got five of them, and I was that pleased to get good images of them that I printed one of the best and met Paul as he had just finished work, and I gave it to him for Jenny thanking her for telling me where to find them.
Well although I go wandering all over Bute in search for things for me to write and for you to read, I still get info from you the public and I appreciate that.
It was not until a few weeks later that I found another one , and that was at the South end of the Island near what is called the’ Hawks Neb’,( a sandstone outcrop of rock that I sent and image of to the Buteman for ‘The Beauty of Bute’ on 25-02-2011) but this one was very was acting very strange, as it was having a sexual encounter with an entirely different species, a Meadow Brown Butterfly.

Well they are both brown with one having more spots than the other and that is where the similarity ends. Either one or the other needs to go to nature’s equivalent of ‘Specsavers’ or get their sexual scents adjusted, as they must be very close to each species for this to happen.

Well I had caught them in the act with my net, and transferred them to my clear plastic jar so that I could get good images of them, and I was not at all embarrassed. After the photo shoot I released them both, still joined together, and they only flew a few feet away and carried on in more ways than one, due to one that was doing all the flying for the two of them and their energy was required elsewhere.
Seemingly that is not an uncommon thing amongst them, but I have no records or info on what the outcome between different species was, if any?
Well that is the summer well and truly over. My net is in the wardrobe as most flying insects will have dug in for the winter, or found a wee cosy corner in your roof space or in a garden shed, but that is not the end. I will still be tramping around the island looking for signs that there is something going on, like looking under a log and finding a frog or toad dug in and sound asleep with its heartbeat slowed down. And there it will stay till the spring. In nest boxes and holes in trees are to be found bats. They stay the winter in a huddle to conserve heat, and there is warmth in numbers, and the bigger the box or hole, the more may be in it.
 

So the winter for me is the same albeit a good bit colder.

Norrie Mulholland

First published in the Buteman 23-11-2012


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